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Artspeak,

Artspeak

Kimberly Phillips

Kimberly Phillips is a Vancouver-based writer, curator and educator. she holds a doctorate in art history from the University of British Columbia, with research interests sited at the convergence of dis- courses on memory, identity and interventions in urban space. She is Director/Curator of Access gallery and regularly teaches on curatorial practices and the history of visual culture at Emily Carr University of Art + Design.

Exhibitions

  • Gastown Follies

    ABIGAIL DEVILLE
    September 14–October 26, 2013

    Abigail DeVille, Gastown Follies, 2013. Alley trash, reclaimed metal, free paint, accumulated debris.

    Abigail DeVille, Gastown Follies, 2013. Alley trash, reclaimed metal, free paint, accumulated debris.

    Abigail DeVille, Gastown Follies, 2013. Alley trash, reclaimed metal, free paint, accumulated debris.

    Abigail DeVille, Gastown Follies, 2013. Alley trash, reclaimed metal, free paint, accumulated debris.

    Abigail DeVille, Gastown Follies, 2013. Alley trash, reclaimed metal, free paint, accumulated debris.

    Abigail DeVille, Gastown Follies, 2013. Alley trash, reclaimed metal, free paint, accumulated debris.

    Abigail Deville’s work is comprised of archaeological constructs imbued with cultural and historical cues, referencing canonical sculptures from recent art history, contemporary social issues, and the movement of solar bodies. Her dark sculptural installations are steeped in destruction and decay, acting as reflections on social and cultural oppression, racial identity, and discrimination within the ruinous decadence of the big city. For her exhibition at Artspeak, DeVille will create a new site-specific installation comprised of materials she scavenges from the streets of Vancouver, particularly in the gallery‚Äôs neighbourhood of Gastown in the Downtown Eastside. Her past work has employed a similar strategy of sourcing materials, using cardboard, broken furniture, bottles and other discarded objects. Her complex vortexes generate a dialogue about the socioeconomics of cities and the displacement of its inhabitants, and her exhibition will directly reference the alleyways and streets of Vancouver.

    Postscript 54: Kimberly Phillips on Gastown Follies (PDF)