Pacific Crossings
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Artspeak,

As a space that connects but is not determined by any one people or place, the Pacific Ocean is a fluid region. Our engagement through it imagines the alliances, meeting points or crossing of paths that can take place and where mutual influence, responsibility and care come to build and sustain a shared body of work and practices. Pacific Crossings is an ongoing conversation and public presentation series that draws participants from various regions across the ocean. This collaborative project works to bring together perspectives in an evolving and dynamic exchange, instigating events and activities that can increase public awareness of the multitude of traditions, histories, and practices, offering potential routes for intersection to take place. Thinking both metaphorically and ecologically, the series will address the care and consideration that must emerge for long-term healthy exchange, and the sharing in responsibility as much as resources.

Pacific Crossings takes place on the unceded Territories of the xwməθkwəy̓əm (Musqueam), Skwxwú7mesh (Squamish) and Səl̓ílwətaʔ (Tsleil-Waututh) First Nations. It is an ongoing series of events conceived of by Makiko Hara, Bopha Chhay (Artspeak), Allison Collins (Western Front), and Shaun Dacey (Richmond Art Gallery).

Pacific Crossings would like to thank the BC Ministry of Tourism, Arts and Culture via the International Presence Fund for making this program possible.

Load Na Dito
June 8, 2019, 3:30pm
Richmond Art Gallery

Join Mark Salvatus & Mayumi Hirano from Load Na Dito (Manila, Philippines) with Bopha Chhay, Allison Collins and Shaun Dacey from Pacific Crossings for a conversation discussing ongoing artistic connections and exchange between Manila and Vancouver. Load Na Dito and Pacific Crossings will discuss the work they do in hosting and nurturing residencies and projects in their home cities.

Load Na Dito will speak about their artistic and research based project based in Manila, Philippines. Developed as a homemade culture, it uses a variety of different spaces as a site for knowledge sharing, inquiry and discussion. The name “load na dito” is borrowed from a popular top up system for cellphone credit in the Philippines, where you can load up credits anywhere you see the sign “load na dito.” This project is a model that allows its founders to develop projects in different locations—building new energies to have and maintain “load”.

We welcome people who would also like to share their connections, practices, projects to join the conversation. Snacks and tea will be served.

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Load Na Dito
June 5, 2019, 7pm
Artspeak

Either a Storm or a Drought: Video works from the Philippines

Either a Storm or a Drought is a one-night video screening and installation, featuring video works by eleven artists from the Philippines. It is curated by the mobile artistic and research based initiative, Load Na Dito.

Referring to ideas that are commonly associated with the Filipino weather, Either a Storm or a Drought explores the ever-changing, unforeseeable and idle state of the life in the Philippines. The works introduced here playfully portray transient and unsettling situations that draw visible and invisible borders between personal, social and political territories.

Annie Pacaña + Baile, KALEIDOSCAPE V.4, 2019, 3:22
Christian Tablazon, If a tree falls in a forest, 2019, 5:47
CMYKA, runExecuteCommand.mp4, 2017, 0:30
Cocoy Lumbao, Negative Cutter, 2017, 5:36
Gerome Soriano, Chocnut Structures, 2018, 6:16
Kanade Yagi, Metabolism of the Wall, 2018, 9:57
Manny Montelibano, Home Sale, 2018, 8:03
Neo Maestro, Banuyo, 2017, 6:31
Rico Entico, Precedence of life according to Mr. Ped Xing, 2017, 6:52
Shireen Seno, Seeing Machines, 2006, 5:00
Tanya and Luna Villanueva, Work Performing, 2019, 4:00

These presentations by Load Na Dito co-founders, researcher-curator Mayumi Hirano and artist-organizer Mark Salvatus, will offer context of their practice working in the Philippines and within their wider communities of the south-east Asian region.

Support for Load Na Dito to visit and conduct research is made possible through the Province of British Columbia through the BC Ministry of Tourism, Arts and Culture via the International Presence Fund.

PACIFIC CROSSINGS is a conversation and public presentation series that draws participants from across the ocean. This collaborative project works to bring together perspectives in an evolving and dynamic exchange, instigating events and activities that can increase public awareness of the multitude of traditions, histories, and practices, offering potential routes for intersection to take place.

PACIFIC CROSSINGS is conceived of by Makiko Hara, Bopha Chhay (Artspeak), Allison Collins (Western Front), and Shaun Dacey (Richmond Art Gallery).

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Load Na Dito
May 22, 2019, 7pm
Western Front

Load Na Dito is an artistic and research project based in Manila, Philippines. Currently located in Cubao, Quezon City, it has been developed as a homemade culture, through its use of any possible space as a site for knowledge sharing, inquiry and discussion. The name “load na dito” is borrowed from a popular top up system for cellphone credit in the Philippines, where you can load up credits anywhere you see the sign “load na dito.” This project is a model that allows its founders to develop projects in different locations—building new energies to have and maintain “load”.

Presentations by Load Na Dito
Wednesday May 22 @ Western Front, 7pm

Screening of Filipino video work
Wednesday June 5 @ Artspeak, 7pm

Conversation about the Load Na Dito community
Saturday June 8 @ Richmond Art Gallery, 3pm

These presentations by Load Na Dito co-founders, researcher-curator Mayumi Hirano and artist-organizer Mark Salvatus, will offer context of their practice working in the Philippines and within their wider communities of the south-east Asian region.

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ERIN GLEESON
On Attachments and Unknowns: On Sharing Unstable Space
February 20, 2019, 7pm
Grand Luxe Hall at Western Front

Visiting as part of the Pacific Crossings series, curator Erin Gleeson will speak about affinitive artistic and curatorial strategies at work in the exhibition On Attachments and Unknowns. This group exhibition was held within the second research residency FIELDS (2017), hosted by SA SA BASSAC, a non-profit contemporary art space in Phnom Penh, Cambodia (2011-2018). Thirteen artists’ works were convened in part to consider practices of imaging personalized countervisions to statecraft ideologies and methods in their respective contexts. On Attachments and Unknowns looked to the space of the ‘How’ to let an exhibition be an unstable space that follows artist’s intentions to resist immediacy of message. With each artist and work located in Southeast Asia, and all but one artist identifying as female, a reflection on the exhibition proposes a series of questions: What can a regionalist and gendered framing of an exhibition offer? How can one curatorially rhyme with the methods by which artists conceive of power within their primarily authoritarian environments? How can an exhibition resist the habit to communicate artist’s resolve, action or agency within political and social movements?

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NOZOMU OGAWA
Alternative Asian Art Networks – How Do They Survive?
January 15, 2019, 7pm
Artspeak

Pacific Crossings welcomes NOZOMU OGAWA, Founder/Director of Art Center Ongoing (Tokyo, Japan) for a research visit and set of public talks to connect with BC’s art communities.

NOZOMU OGAWA will share his recent experience of a three month research trip he undertook to eighty three art spaces throughout Southeast Asia. Throughout this trip, Ogawa was inspired by the concept and practice of “collective” ways of working among artists. Notably, the sharing of resources and networking, as pragmatic strategies within a complex socio-political context with no public funding for the arts. Inspired by this research, Ogawa founded the Ongoing Collective with his colleagues consisting of artists, curators and musicians who were seeking new economies and strategies for alternative cultural production. The results of his trip can be seen on the web site.

Nozomu will also be speaking at the Richmond Art Gallery on Saturday, January 12, at 2pm. A talk entitled Alternative Tokyo Art Scene – What’s going on? Nozomu will discuss Art Center Ongoing, an independently run art space and cafe he founded, without public funding, eleven years ago in Kichijyoji, Tokyo.

NOZOMU OGAWA was born and lives in Tokyo and is currently Director of Art Center Ongoing. He graduated from Musashino Art University in 2001, and completed an MA from the Graduate School of Interdisciplinary Information Studies, University of Tokyo. From 2002 to 2006, he organized an annual juried exhibition showcasing a diverse network of artists. In 2008, based on this network, he launched Art Center Ongoing, an art complex in Kichijoji. He also serves as Chief Director of TERATOTERA, an artist project that develops programs in the area between JR Koenji station and Kokubunji station.

PACIFIC CROSSINGS is an ongoing series of events conceived of by Makiko Hara, Bopha Chhay (Artspeak), Allison Collins (Western Front), and Shaun Dacey (Richmond Art Gallery).

Pacific Crossings would like to thank the BC Ministry of Tourism, Arts and Culture via the International Presence Fund for making this program possible.

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Nozomu Ogawa
Alternative Tokyo Art Scene – What’s going on?
January 12, 2019, 2pm
Richmond Art Gallery

Nozomu Ogawa will discuss Art Center Ongoing, the alternative art space/cafe he founded eleven years ago in Kichijyoji, Tokyo. Independently run without public funding since its founding, Art Centre Ongoing is one of the most active and notable art space/residency programs in Tokyo. The space hosts an international artist residency program, and holds bi-weekly exhibitions with public talks, workshops and live performances. Ogawa will also share TERATOTERA a year round public art project developed in collaboration with City of Tokyo and Art Council Tokyo. Ogawa’s presentation will discuss the Tokyo alternative art scene and unique art practices by the young and emerging artists.

NOZOMU OGAWA was born and lives in Tokyo and is currently Director of Art Center Ongoing. He graduated from Musashino Art University in 2001, and completed an MA from the Graduate School of Interdisciplinary Information Studies, University of Tokyo. From 2002 to 2006, he organized an annual juried exhibition showcasing a diverse network of artists. In 2008, based on this network, he launched Art Center Ongoing, an art complex in Kichijoji. He also serves as Chief Director of TERATOTERA, an artist project that develops programs in the area between JR Koenji station and Kokubunji station.

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